Restoring Human Dignity, One Person at a Time

Human dignity is such an important part of our overall health and well-being physically, mentally, emotionally, psychologically, and spiritually. Unfortunately, life experiences can chip away at our human dignity, and in some cases even brutally rip it apart. However, I discovered an almost magical method that literally helps restore human dignity, one person at a time.

It was in February of 2000 when I found Feldenkrais. That statement sounds like it has an almost poetic and biblical sound to it, and I mean no disrespect. I do mean that it changed my life forever and helped me see the light.

After I took my first Feldenkrais class, I knew I had to become a practitioner of this remarkable movement therapy and share it with everyone who was looking to move better, feel better, look better, and generally improve their activity level and quality of life. To restore their human dignity.

Then I found out that the training was a grueling four-year-long program to become a Feldenkrais Practitioner. Yikes! I was still paying off my student loan from my physical therapy program! But, I just had to do it, and I graduated from my program and became a Certified Feldenkrais Practitioner in November of 2009.

The Feldenkrais philosophy is to restore human dignity through the process of exploring primitive movement, finding ways to move effortlessly and easily in your body and your mind, and challenge your belief system in a gentle and non-judgmental approach.

The founder of the method, Moshe Feldenkrais, was a genius, a survivalist, and martial artist. He was the first European ever to earn a black belt in Judo. The principles of martial arts are deeply embedded in his method.

In a weird twist of fate (or was it destiny?) I began training in Ninpo Tai Jutsu, and ancient Japanese martial art, in September of 2003. The combined teachings of Feldenkrais and martial arts had a profound and powerful impact on every aspect of my life. Through these harmoniously connected movement arts, I found my true self and regained my own human dignity.

I continue to promote and share the principles of both Feldenkrais and martial arts to my hundreds of clients, colleagues, friends, my many speaking audiences, workshop attendees, and pretty much anyone who will listen. Because I am dedicated to restoring human dignity, one person at a time. And I refuse to quit until I do.

“Be careful what you tell yourself, and do not belittle yourself, even in jest. Negative, deprecating self-talk can do significant harm to your self-image.”

–Cheryl L Ilov, Forever Fit and Flexible: Feeling Fabulous at Fifty and Beyond.